Molly’s story

Molly’s story

Who better to share their experience of Dove Shower Foam than someone who experiences the world through touch? That’s why we asked Molly, a self-confessed beauty product obsessive, to try it out. She recounts her journey after losing her sight, how her sense of touch became so important – and why that makes this unique foaming body wash so new and different to her.

“I lost my sight when I was 14 years old. From the time I was six months old, my family knew there was a medical issue, but it wasn’t until I was four that they were given a diagnosis of a disease called Retinitis pigmentosa. It’s a rare genetic eye disease that causes gradual loss of vision.

For me, seeing the world is less about seeing it through my eyes, and more about seeing it with my other senses. My hands give me all the feedback that a sighted person would rely on their eyes for, so I navigate the world by touch. When I’m walking around a store I pick up every garment – I’m feeling the fabrics, the textures and the shapes. And colours aren’t about what they look like anymore. Blue became more about how my fingers feel running through water, and the colour green is more about the smell of freshly cut grass, and the feeling of it under bare feet.

I think that Dove chose me to feel their shower foam because I’m not so distracted by what I see in life. I’m focused on all of my other senses. It’s unlike any other product I’ve tried. The foam feels really light, fluffy and weightless. You pump it out and it’s like foam, and then you rub it in and it’s like a lathery cream – it feels really moisturizing and hydrating for the skin.


Through public speaking, I started focusing on other people and supporting them the way I felt I needed to be supported. I found happiness and purpose in my life. So that’s why I work fulltime as a motivational speaker. In a sense it’s what saved me.

For people who are lucky enough to be able to see the world, why not try relying on your other senses a little bit. Don’t focus so much on what you’re seeing and start letting yourself experience the world through all your senses. I might have lost my sight, but I have not lost my ability to experience beauty in the world.”